Motorcycle KTM RC8 R Circuit Japan Driveclub Mix Bike HD

Racing Wheel : Thrustmaster T500RS + Shift TH8R
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The KTM 1190 RC8 is a sport bike made by KTM.[1] The first generation 2008 model had a 1,148 cc (70.1 cu in) V-twin engine and was the Austrian manufacturer’s first-ever Superbike design. The RC8 model was supplemented with RC8 R models one year later in 2009 and the RC8 designation had its last year of production in 2010. Current models from 2009 through 2013 use a 1,195 cc (72.9 cu in) V-twin engine with a twin spark per cylinder technology [2] design debuting on the 2011 model.

The first concept of the bike appeared in 2005, powered by the Super Duke 999 cc (61.0 cu in) v-twin. The displacement was increased to 1,148 cc (70.1 cu in) for the production version. The bike has a steel trellis frame with a cast aluminium seat subframe. The suspension uses high-end inverted forks and an alloy, double-sided swingarm made by WP, a KTM subsidiary. The bike for 2013 and on comes in a single color, black and white with orange accents.

The RC8 R was delivered to the United States in 2010 as a 2011 model with more track-oriented features than the standard RC8. Engine displacement increased to 1,195 cc (72.9 cu in) with a higher compression ratio of 13.5:1. It has titanium intake valves and a low-friction diamond-like carbon (DLC) treatment on its camshafts’ finger followers. The RC8 R’s WP suspension includes a 43 mm inverted fork at the front end, with a titanium-aluminum-nitride low-stiction coating on its sliders. A high-end shock supports the bike’s rear, and its piston rod is also finished with the titanium-aluminum-nitride coating. The fork has three modes of adjustment (compression damping, rebound damping and spring preload), while the shock separates the compression damping into high and low speed circuits and has ride-height adjustability. An adjustable steering damper completes the suspension.

The RC8 R offers many chassis adjustments not found on other superbikes. In addition to the suspension, the rider can adjust many other parts on the bike including the front brake lever, the rear brake pedal, the clutch lever, the handlebars, the shifter, the footpegs, and the seat/subframe height. Essentially, the adjustable options allow the RC8 R to accommodate riders of various sizes

Internal improvements were made for these model years based on rider reviews and in-house testing. 250 models were made for North America for 2011 and 2012 years. The KTM engineers included a heavier crankshaft and flywheel aimed at reducing the buzzy nature of the previous RC8R and to emphasize low-end torque. Throttle butterflies were remapped to reduce the amount of opening under small throttle inputs for much smoother transitions and to address the “snatchy throttle” complaints directed at the earlier models. The new cylinder head uses two spark plugs in each cylinder; below 7,000 rpm only one of the two fires, while above 7,000 both are used for optimum burning and reduced detonation which also allows for a re-tuned ECU that has revamped cam timing and the 52 mm throttle bodies. Also new with this model are cast aluminum Marchesini wheels and strategic front and rear suspension updates

At the launch of the RC8 superbike KTM announced it will race in the RC8 in the FIM Superstock championship in 2008. KTM’s two-year plan is to get the bike regularly on the podium in superstock before moving up to the Superbike World Championship. For 2009 the KTM RC8 Super Cup has been running as a one make support class at selected rounds of the British Superbike Championship, and in 2010 Redline KTM are competing in the newly formed BSB Evo class with rider James Edmeades.

For 2012, Chris Filmore (USA) riding for the KTM Factory Racing team earned his career best finish at the final round of the AMA Pro SuperBike Series held at NOLA Motorsports Park on October 6 finishing 4th that day, 5th place the next,[6] ending the season 11th overall and is signed with the team for 2013

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The EMD SD70 is a series of diesel-electric locomotives produced by Electro-Motive Diesel in response to the GE Dash 9-44CW. Production commenced in late 1992[1] and since then over 4,000 units have been produced; most of these are the SD70M and SD70MAC models. All locomotives of this series are hood units with C-C trucks.

Prior to the SD70ACe and SD70M-2 models, all SD70 models were delivered with the self-steering HTCR radial truck.[2] The radial truck allows the axles to steer in curves which reduces wear on the wheels and railhead. With the introduction of the SD70ACe and SD70M-2 models, EMD introduced a new bolsterless non-radial HTSC truck as the standard truck for these models in an effort to reduce costs. The HTCR-4 radial truck is still an option.

The SD70 uses the smaller standard cab or spartan cab, common on older 60 Series locomotives, instead of the larger, more modern comfort cab. This makes it hard to distinguish from the nearly-identical SD60, the only difference being the use of the HTCR radial truck instead of the HT-C truck mounted under the SD60. The main spotting feature is the difference in length between the two models – the SD60’s 71 feet, 2 inches vs. the SD70’s 72 feet, 4 inches. The SD70 also rides higher as its frame is approximately 1⁄2 inch (13 mm) higher than the SD60’s. This model is equipped with direct current (DC) traction motors, which simplifies the locomotive’s electrical system by obviating the need for computer-controlled inverters (as are required for alternating current (AC) power). It is equipped with the 4,000 horsepower (3,000 kW), 16-cylinder EMD 710 prime mover. One hundred and twenty-two examples of this model locomotive were produced for Norfolk Southern Railway (NS), Conrail (CR), Illinois Central Railroad (IC) and Southern Peru Copper Corporation (SPCC). Conrail’s assets were split between Norfolk Southern (PRR) and CSX Transportation in 1999, and all 24 of Conrail’s SD70 units went to NS. Other than the CR paint scheme these units were built to NS specifications and numbered (2557 – 2580) in series with their SD70’s.

Production of the standard cab at EMD’s London, Ontario plant ended in 1994. The 24 Conrail SD70s were assembled from kits at Conrail’s (later NS’s) Juniata Shops in Altoona, Pennsylvania, and the IC and SPCC SD70s were assembled from kits at Super Steel Schenectady. All SD70s are still in service with Norfolk Southern and Canadian National (CN), which merged Illinois Central in 1999.

The SD70M has a wide nose and a large comfort cab (officially known as the “North American Safety Cab”), allowing crew members to ride more comfortably inside of the locomotive than the older standard cab designs. There are two versions of this cab on SD70Ms: the Phase I cab, which was first introduced on the SD60M, and is standard on the SD80MAC and SD90MACs, and the Phase II cab, which is a boxier design similar to the original three-piece windscreen on the SD60M, which is shared with the Phase II SD90MAC, SD89MAC, and SD80ACe. The Phase II cab has a two-piece windscreen like the Phase I windscreen but the design of the nose is more boxy, with a taller square midsection for more headroom.

The SD70M is equipped with D90TR DC traction motors and the 710G3B prime mover.[3] They are capable of generating 109,000 lbf (480 kN) of continuous tractive effort.[3] From mid-2000, the SD70M was produced with SD45-style flared radiators allowing for the larger radiator cores needed for split-cooling. Split-cooling is a feature that separates the coolant circuit for the prime mover and the circuit for the air pumps and turbocharger. There are two versions of this radiator: the older version has two large radiator panels on each side, and the newer version has four square panels on each side. This modification was made in response to the enactment of the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Tier I environmental regulations.

Production of the SD70M ceased in late 2004 as production of the SD70M-2 model began (the EPA’s Tier II regulations went into effect on 1 January 2005). 1,646 examples of the SD70M model were produced. Purchasers included CSX, New York Susquehanna & Western (NYSW; part of EMDX order no. 946531[4]), Norfolk Southern and Southern Pacific (SP; now part of the Union Pacific Railroad), but the vast majority were purchased by Union Pacific.

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